Video: Presiding Bishop asks for prayers following shootings

Resources for prayer and conversation

 

[Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs press release] Episcopal Church Presiding Bishop and Primate Michael Curry has issued the following video asking every Episcopalian to share in deep prayer following the shootings in the United States.  The video is available here.

Many Episcopal groups have prepared resources that may help congregations and individuals in their prayer and conversation this weekend.

Comments

  1. Two wrongs never make a right. The tragic, senseless slayings in Dallas were no doubt sparked by the police shootings of two young black men earlier in the month, with both cases receiving much publicity. Decades of “stop and frisk” actions by police as part of our absurd and futile “war on drugs”, combined with out of control trigger fingers on too many officers, have caused deep animosity between citizens and police in many communities. It is long past time for mutual respect.

    • Doug Desper says:

      Ken: the sniper had a well-supplied arsenal back at his house, including bomb material that he had laid in some time before any of the recent police shootings. He didn’t need much reason to act – and was looking for one. Yes, police abuses happen and should be condemned and corrected, but let’s not give the criminal the out that he thought that he deserved as he targeted and assassinated police. I really hope that ENS and commenters on these matters will go past CNN and MSNBC coverage and look at the details of who is involved in these incidents and what their backgrounds are. Too much has been gotten just plain wrong on this and other sites. Recent memory of this recalls how Occupy Wall Street was adored and praised until they were exposed as the anarchy group that they were and are. Other memories recall the premature, disgraceful — and totally indefensible — public crucifixion of Officer Darrin Wilson of Ferguson, MO – which was never apologized for or corrected in the media or by those who gave public opinions without loading their minds. Michael Brown was made up to be the “gentle giant” and college-bound saint, but was proven to be a predator, thief, and thug who went for Wilson’s gun, and charged towards Wilson. Investigations, including by the Justice Department, cleared Wilson, but keyboard commandos on every news outlet and blog – including this one – ruined his life. Talk about “respecting the dignity of all persons!” Didn’t happen here. Now, these latest shooting incidents demand even more of our prudence before clergy pronouncements and blogosphere opinions further muddy or ignore facts. The rush to respond with some sage opinion or prayer needs to be tempered by more humility and fact-finding. Yes, there are police who need to be arrested. They are few. More than those are the TV-ready victims in Black Lives Matter and other anarchy groups who live as a part of a grievance industry and are paid to stir up trouble, who dare police to keep order, and and are nothing more than rent-a-mobs funded by monied backers like George Soros. Did anybody take note of the BLM looters who were taking advantage of the carnage in Dallas? Some people hid behind police when the shooting started, others with professionally made signs dropped them and began robbing others.

      • Pamela Payne says:

        The tragedies of loss of human life, no matter the circumstances, is enough for us to mourn. Working to improve relations in our society based on Jesus’ injunction that we love one another as He loves us should be our goal.. Let’s avoid all the political rhetoric and finger-pointing on both sides, and demonstrate to a hurting world what the love of God and Christ looks like.

  2. I suggest that The Prayer Attributed to Saint Francis in the Book of Common Prayer be used as a resource. May we all be instruments of God’s peace. May we be blessed with peace and all good.

  3. Here is the prayer that Bishop Curry invites us to use, The Prayer for the Human Family:
    O God, you made us in your own image and redeemed us through Jesus your Son: Look with compassion on the whole human family; take away the arrogance and hatred which infect our hearts; break down the walls that separate us; unite us in bonds of love; and work through our struggle and confusion to accomplish your purposes on earth; that, in your good time, all nations and races may serve you in harmony around your heavenly throne; through Jesus Christ
    our Lord. Amen.

  4. LaRae Rutenbar says:

    Bishop Curry–Go to Dallas. Speak for us in the streets, the police houses, the churches. Go with Presiding Bishops of Methodist, Lutheran …whoever else…and be the face and heart of the church. You are preaching to the choir–we need you to preach to the world and tell them –we grieve, we will work to change the violence and we are here!

  5. William Dyson says:

    Recent shootings in Baton Rouge and St. Paul, as well as Dallas, could have been avoided. The first two speak to a total disregard for the black population. The last shooting appears to be a response to the previous two. From my perspective, all are unjustified. It will take a whole lot of discussion by all – citizens, police, lawmakers – in order to get a sense of what the frustrations are. Talking openly about people’s concerns is a beginning and only a beginning. We have not taken advantage of the opportunity to have these discussions. It appears as though we are ill prepared to do this, or lacking the will. We have the opportunity now. Let us rise to the occasion.

    William Dyson
    Wyncote PA 19095

  6. George M Jones says:

    “My people are destroyed for lack of knowledge…” – truth, even if 2900 years old is still truth.

    Though Hosea brings a strong message of condemnation, it is laced with the marvelous grace of God’s reconciliation and love for His people and the world. The Spiritual Leadership of our Church and churches has and continues to struggle with how we are to be God’s witness against such this “lack of knowledge” among the “people.”

    May God continue to lead our Presiding Bishop, all Bishops, Priests, and the laity in our Church – to understand their place in this time of angst; granting them the insight, giving them the setting, and empowering their message of Peace and Reconciliation in our time [Esther 4:14]. Amen.

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