Diocese of Los Angeles Bishop Mary Glasspool moving to New York

[Episcopal News Service] Diocese of Los Angeles Bishop Suffragan Mary Glasspool will become an assistant bishop in the Diocese of New York next April.

The two dioceses announced the change Nov. 14.

Glasspool, 61, was elected bishop suffagran of Los Angeles on Dec. 4, 2009, and was consecrated on May 15, 2010, along with Bishop Suffragan Diane Jardine Bruce who was elected by the same convention that elected Glasspool.

Glasspool was at the time the 17th woman to be elected a bishop in The Episcopal Church, and the first openly lesbian woman to become a bishop in the Anglican Communion.

She was born on Staten Island when her father was the rector jointly of All Saints Church and St. Simon’s Church. She grew up in Goshen, New York, after her father became the rector of St. James Church.

“Mary is a person of extraordinary ability and deep faith, a true friend, and a seasoned bishop,” New York Bishop Andrew Dietsche told delegates at the diocese’s annual convention. “She will bless us in myriad ways, and it is such a personal joy to make this announcement!”

Glasspool wrote to the Diocese of Los Angeles about the announcement, saying in part that “to write that I am deeply grateful for this time of service in the Diocese of Los Angeles is an understatement.”

Diocesan Bishop Jon Bruno told the diocese that “although we together feel a sense of loss and sadness at Bishop Glasspool’s departure, we can also share with her our ongoing support and appreciation for her many gifts and skills that she has shared with us so generously.”

Comments

  1. Jean Shirey says:

    With respect, have we not reached the point when posts no longer need to say, “…openly gay” or “…openly lesbian”?

    • Selena Smith says:

      Jean Shirey wrote “With respect” in comments and “reached the point” I wonder what “point” that is? The author of the posted article also wrote “17th woman to be elected a bishop . . .” Since Bishop Glasspool chose/chooses to identify herself by characteristics of woman, openly lesbian, then others can use those respectfully, which I think the writer of the article has done. Presiding Bishop Curry chooses to identify himself as black, and as the first Black Presiding Bishop. If I choose to identify myself as Hispanic, Latina and someone acknowledges that, I am proud and honored and feel respected that a person has used those characteristics.

  2. Selena Smith says:

    Jean Shirey wrote “With respect” in comments and “reached the point” I wonder what “point” that is? The author of the posted article also wrote “17th woman to be elected a bishop . . .” Since Bishop Glasspool chose/chooses to identify herself by characteristics of woman, openly lesbian, then others can use those respectfully, which I think the writer of the article has done. Presiding Bishop Curry chooses to identify himself as black, and as the first Black Presiding Bishop. If I choose to identify myself as Hispanic, Latina and someone acknowledges that, I am proud and honored and feel respected that a person has used those characteristics.

  3. Doug Desper says:

    One wonders why race or gender or sexual identity are often named (sometimes exploited) as accomplishments. If we look back on Dr. King’s view of such things we should never hear that someone is anything except what they say and what they actually accomplish. Anything less than a record of accomplishment serve no purpose except to check off diversity markers. Haven’t we gotten into enough recent anguish settling for mere symbolism over substance?

  4. Is it then going to be okay if someone chooses to respectfully identify themselves as a white , heterosexual, male? I think beginning to move beyond labels would be helpful.
    Blessings

  5. Joanna Griner Cawley says:

    However anyone wishes to identify themselves should be the norm, should be ok, should be accepted by the rest of us.
    If a person’s life experience tells them they need to identify themselves on a more “detailed” level, in order to be understood, or better yet, to help the next person with a common feature who cannot create identification with their world, then who is to say which is the right or wrong way? Whether the Bishop chooses to put her identity out there or others repeat it in articles about her, its who she is.
    We should allow each other to represent ourselves the way we feel best, and if its ok with the individual, not be concerned with that reiteration in press, common parlance or characterizations. in searching for an email address to thank Bishop Glasspool for confirming my son this past Sunday, I stumbled on this press release. I didn’t know she was lesbian, or out, de facto. I was happy to have a woman at the altar – Her power at the pulpit and her evident love for the kids and her calling was what I identified with as a woman, a family member of a confirmand and an episcopalian fellow. As well, I love thsat our faith accepts into the priesthood women and LGBT people!
    It’s all down to identification. If I were lesbian and having my child confirmed, I do think I may feel a deeper connection to the process if I knew the priest entrusted with my child’s faith and journey shared a similar experience. No matter what, she blew the socks off everyone in that church! She is amazing.

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