Presiding Bishop’s 2014 World Refugee Day message

'I was a stranger and you welcomed me'

[Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs press release] “Remember in prayer all who flee persecution and suffering in search of security and peace, remember the baptismal promise to strive for justice and peace, and reaffirm our commitment to welcoming the stranger as Christ himself,” Episcopal Church Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori states in her 2014 World Refugee Day message.

World Refugee Day is June 20, and in her message, the Presiding Bishop also heralds the work of Episcopal Migration Ministries (EMM) for its extensive resettlement and advocacy efforts.

The following is Presiding Bishop Jefferts Schori’s message.


2014 World Refugee Day

I was a stranger and you welcomed me.

On June 20, communities across the globe will celebrate World Refugee Day, honoring the strength, resilience, and contributions of refugees. In 2014, the world has seen the heights to which refugees can rise when given the chance to start a new life in dignity and peace. A former refugee became the first American citizen in a generation to win the Boston Marathon. At the same time the world has been challenged by the ongoing and urgent need to protect the vulnerable fleeing conflicts in Syria, South Sudan, the Congo, Myanmar, and Central Africa. This World Refugee Day, The Episcopal Church honors the proud legacy of our Church’s intentional work of welcoming refugees – a ministry that began in 1939 through the Presiding Bishop’s Fund for World Relief.

The United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees estimates that there are currently more than 15 million refugees worldwide, the majority of whom are women and children. These vulnerable individuals have fled their homes, often with little more than the clothes on their backs, and frequently leaving family members behind. Less than 1% of these 15 million refugees will ever be resettled in a third country. Many will live out their lives in uncertainty or the indignity of refugee “camps,” as essentially stateless persons. The United States has a proud tradition of resettling more refugees each year than any other receiving country, and since 1988 Episcopal Migration Ministries (EMM) has partnered with the U.S. government to welcome refugees into new communities.

In 2013 alone, EMM helped almost 5,000 refugees build new lives in security and peace in 30 communities across the United States. To carry out this work, EMM collaborates with local partner agencies in 26 Episcopal dioceses and 22 states to welcome those fleeing violence and persecution. This ministry links public funding with private donations and volunteers to accompany refugees through their first months in the United States. Each year, EMM welcomes an ever-diversifying refugee population – from more than 69 nations to date. The EMM affiliate network includes staff and volunteers who provide refugees with the essentials needed as they begin their new lives in the U.S., including housing, food, furnishings, and orientation to life in their new communities. That assistance includes connection to services like English classes and job training, access to health care, enrolling their children in school, and understanding the other services available in the community. Our communities and congregations are in turn enriched socially, culturally, and spiritually by the presence and contributions of refugees.

This World Refugee Day, remember in prayer all who flee persecution and suffering in search of security and peace, remember the baptismal promise to strive for justice and peace, and reaffirm our commitment to welcoming the stranger as Christ himself.

The Most Rev. Katharine Jefferts Schori
Presiding Bishop and Primate
The Episcopal Church

Obispa Presidente de la Iglesia Episcopal presenta Mensaje de 2014 del Día Mundial de los Refugiados

Fui forastero y me acogisteis.

[19 de junio de 2014] “Recuerde en oración a todos los que huyen de la persecución y el sufrimiento y que buscan la seguridad y la paz, recuerde la promesa bautismal de luchar por la justicia y la paz, y reafirmar nuestro compromiso de dar la bienvenida al extraño como al mismo Cristo”, la Obispa Presidente de la Iglesia Episcopal Katharine Jefferts Schori indica en su mensaje de 2014 del Día Mundial de los Refugiados.

El Día Mundial de los Refugiados es el 20 de junio, y en su mensaje, la Obispa Presidente también anuncia la obra del Ministerio Episcopal de Migración (EMM) y sus grandes esfuerzos de reasentamiento y defensoría.

A continuación el mensaje de la Obispa Presidente Jefferts Schori.

Día Mundial de los Refugiados 2014

Fui forastero y me acogisteis.

El 20 de junio, las comunidades de todo el mundo celebrarán el Día Mundial del Refugiado, en honor a la fuerza, resistencia, y a las contribuciones de los refugiados. En el 2014, el mundo ha podido ver lo tan alto que pueden llegar los refugiados cuando se les brinda la oportunidad de empezar una vida nueva con dignidad y paz. Un ex refugiado se convirtió en el primer ciudadano estadounidense en una generación al ganar el maratón de Boston. Al mismo tiempo, el mundo ha sido cuestionado por la necesidad continua y urgente de proteger a los vulnerables que huyen de los conflictos en Siria, Sudán del Sur, el Congo, Myanmar, y África Central. En este Día Mundial del Refugiado, la Iglesia Episcopal honra el legado de orgullo del trabajo intencional de nuestra Iglesia al acoger a los refugiados – un ministerio que comenzó en 1939 a través del Fondo de la Obispa Presidente para Ayuda Mundial.

El Alto Comisionado de las Naciones Unidas para los Refugiados estima que actualmente hay más de 15 millones de refugiados en todo el mundo, la mayoría de los cuales son mujeres y niños. Estos individuos vulnerables han huido de sus hogares, a menudo con poco más que la ropa que llevaban puesta, y con frecuencia dejando atrás a familiares. Menos del 1% de estos 15 millones de refugiados nunca serán re-establecidos en un tercer país. Muchos vivirán sus vidas en la incertidumbre o en la indignidad de “campos” para refugiados como personas esencialmente sin patria. Los Estados Unidos tiene una orgullosa tradición de reasentar a refugiados cada año y más que en cualquier otro país que los recibe, y desde 1988 el Ministerio Episcopal de Migración (EMM) se han asociado con el gobierno de los EE.UU. para recibir a los refugiados en nuevas comunidades.

Sólo en 2013, el Ministerio Episcopal de Migración ayudó a casi 5.000 refugiados a construir una nueva vida con seguridad y paz en 30 comunidades de los Estados Unidos. Para llevar a cabo este trabajo, la EMM colabora con agencias locales asociadas en 26 diócesis episcopales y 22 estados para dar la bienvenida a quienes huyen de la violencia y la persecución. Este ministerio vincula la financiación pública con donaciones privadas y voluntarios para acompañar a los refugiados a través de sus primeros meses que están en los Estados Unidos. Cada año, la EMM da la bienvenida a una población diversificada de refugiados – de más de 69 países hasta la fecha. La red de afiliados EMM incluye el personal y los voluntarios que proporcionan a los refugiados con los elementos necesarios a medida que comienzan su nueva vida en los EE.UU., lo cual incluye vivienda, la alimentación, el mobiliario, y la orientación sobre la vida en sus nuevas comunidades. Esa asistencia incluye la conexión a servicios como clases de inglés y capacitación para el trabajo, el acceso a la asistencia sanitaria, inscripción a sus hijos en la escuela, y tener un mejor conocimiento sobre los otros servicios disponibles en la comunidad. Nuestras comunidades y congregaciones están a su vez enriquecidas socialmente, culturalmente y espiritualmente por la presencia y las contribuciones de los refugiados.

En este Día Mundial del Refugiado, recuerde en oración a todos los que huyen de la persecución y el sufrimiento y que buscan la seguridad y la paz, recuerde la promesa bautismal de luchar por la justicia y la paz, y reafirmar nuestro compromiso de dar la bienvenida al extraño como al mismo Cristo.

La Reverendísima Katharine Jefferts Schori
Obispa Presidente y Primada
La Iglesia Episcopal

Comments

  1. Erna Lund says:

    Indeed the Church inclusive(Episcopal/other denominations/faiths) in the United States together with the U.S. government has done little to alleviate the tragic refugee situation in the world given the wealth of the United States and also the coffers of the respective religious institutions. The desperate Humanitarian, moral calling to our leaders has basically been in platitudes comparatively speaking to our resources in our blessed affluent country! Currently there are Millions of Palestinian refugees throughout the Middle East(Jordan,Syria,Lebanon,Iraq …) who have beenrepeatedly forced to flee from one refugee camp to another (when Israel forced them out in 1948) with no right to return; other refugees displaced by war over 500,000+ to Turkey,800,000+ to Lebanon, 567,000+ to Jordan,200,000+ to Iraq,130,000+ to Egypt, and 6,500,000+ internally displaced persons in Syria (including Palestinians). Source: National Geographic March 2014.

Speak Your Mind

*

Full names required. Read our Comment Policy. General comments and suggestions about Episcopal News Service, as well as reports of commenting misconduct, can be e-mailed to news@episcopalchurch.org.